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Brake Caliper Front Conversion.


tercellen
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Hi!

For 2 years ago I installed a ta62 brake booster and master cylinder into my ke35. Huge difference! Now I have also installed front calipers from the same ta62 into my ke35. Tried bleeding it about ten times but everytime I started the engine the pedal sank to the floor. I tried yesterday reinstall the old ke35 stock calipers and that made it a alot better!

So what's wrong? Are the ta62's calipers harder to evacuate the air from or do they fail remaining pressure somehow?at least I can't see any leaks from them...

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I rechecked the clearance for the bolt pattern. It's the same pattern but, the ta62's calipers uses a m12 bolt while the ke35's bolts are m10. So you need to drill out the holes on the dust shield. The ke35 stock discs can be used. They are just bearly smaller than the ta62's.

Here's a picture showing the ta62 caliper on the ke35's dust shield. But without drilled out holes for the m12 bolts

post-16361-0-04370700-1465210808_thumb.jpg

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Let's take a look at the minimum boiling temperatures of DOT brake fluid as specified by the Department of Transportation.

dot-fluid-boiling-points.png

Remember, these are only the minimum standards. Brake fluid manufacturers can and often do improve on these figures and it is possible to find DOT 4 brake fluid with a higher boiling point than some DOT 5.1 fluids on the market.

Since DOT 4 and 5.1 are both glycol-based brake fluids they are compatible with each other, which means they can be readily mixed without harming your brake system. It is important never to mistake DOT 5.1 (glycol-based) with DOT 5 which is silicone-based and should never be mixed with any other DOT fluid.

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Brake Engineer Hat on - DOT3, DOT4, DOT4+ and DOT5.1 are all Glycol based. The differences are in viscosity and boiling point. Use the grade that your car calls for (Volvos are usually DOT4), with DOT4 and DOT4+ pretty much interchangeable. DOT5 is silicone based. Do NOT interchange glycol and silicone based fluids.

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DOT 5 is used in systems that cannot afford to absorb water and systems that see a much higher brake temp. A lot of old roadsters and classic car guys use it because it prevents any rusting. It also protects any painted parts if a brake leak should occur... which would total destroy the paint if they used something other than DOT 5. The entire system has to be rebuilt to use it... like the Master cylinder, Slave, lines, seals, ect. You cannot switch back after going with DOT 5 since its silicone base is there for life.

 

interesting shit... I can't believe they make DOT 5 in silicon and DOT 5.1 in glycol, its is guaranteed to confuse people! I'm sure DOT 4 will do you.

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