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Tips for First Timer


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going to purchase a ke30 or ke55 to begin playing around with engines and learning to work on a car. do you guys have any tips on starting off playing around with cars and k engines? (tools, basic needs, easy mods etc.)

cars have alwasy been my passion and I'm finally going to start tinkering with one, and the old corolla has alwasy been one of my favourites

cheers

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Find a car with the best body you can. The mechanicals are easy. 

Then get yourself a full set of preferably factory manuals and learn as you go. Initially have fun fixing whatever needs fixing, but do bear in mind not to spend too much if you think you might like to modify things one day. But really, standard replacement mechanical parts are cheap and readily accessible.

There is also a great deal of info on the site here. Look at other build threads, have fun using the search function, and ask away when you get stuck, or need inspiration. 

They really are great cars!

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i say dive in head first and take apart the carb and clean and rebuild it.

it should be the most understood part of the car but few younger folk know anything about them nowadays.

it is where all the action happens and where most of the daily driver problems lie.

if u attempt to learn about it by reading forums alone, without having taken one apart, you will un-learn, and understand less.

that is my advice.

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as for tools some of the most important for an old toyota are

1. impact screwdriver, required because all screws will be seized

2. multimeter with digital display

3. vacuum gauge, suggest just buying a chinese gauge on ebay and sticking a barb and hose on it, this will cost about 5 dollars

4. feeler gauge, no DIYer one ever sets valve clearances correctly on any engine that ive ever purchased. learn to do it propperly. also good for spark plug gap and contact points if you have a points distributor

5. some sort of book on the basics of old engines. i am sure haynes or gregories have a few

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Perhaps a bit extreme pulling down a well functioning carb the day after you get it. 

Id suggest changing all the oils, new filters and points and  adjusting the tappets!  Then when you get keen, replace the points with electronic ignition.

You will love it and learn a lot as you tinker. We're here if you get stuck. 

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nah i stand by it. people get turned off by carbs because they look complicated. best to dive in and start with it.
And who said its well functioning? haha
Hes about to but one, it wont be off someone whos looked after it. itl be full of grime, and i would place a hefty bet that the carb will need attention and that the seller will have wound on the idle screw to hide a bad idle.
I'm adamant of it, if its a stock motor that he buys he will be pulling it apart to clean it.

You have to admit, these carbies are a bitch.

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Buy your car. Get the best possible tech manual ( genuine Toyota are really helpful). Drive her around for a while and identify the stuff that needs to be done. Read about it and then have a crack at fixing it. I like the adage " if it aint broke don't touch it." Then decide what direction you want to go, be it daily drive, mild or wild street weapon or full blown race car. Above all take your time and enjoy the rolla experience.

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On ‎24‎/‎09‎/‎2017 at 11:42 AM, rebuilder86 said:

can you get a genuine toyota workshop manual for this thing?? 
i want one

Here ya go young fella

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-Yb6y6qxw1gdkt3dnQ2SFVkQzQ/view 

 

Edited by frosty
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.hmm I'm highly embarrased i didnt know avout this. and i should be.

if i were there id hump ur leg.

i just sat up all night reading that from beginning to end.

it has so many of the things i have been looking for but never found, eg, stock jet sizes for different carbs in different markets.

think ill get my drill out today and put a bigger hole through my secondary :p

 

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