Banjo

Distributorless 5K Engine

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Yeh, Taz did something similar, but instead of using COPs, he mounted quad coils on the side of the engine.

1028431985_TAZsetup.JPG.382b924958cc13df226f96bf2b3f994b.JPG

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With the custom cas I built, it has a 'dual pulse' on cylinder 1 and singles on the other 3 so the ecu will now know which cylinder is actually firing. Doing this you can run quad coils like this as well as sequential injection.... firing the injectors individually as the fuel is required essentially. 

Real nice neat setup !   I believe the Nissan CAS is under that spun aluminium lid on the dizzy. 

Cheers Banjo

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Well here is us guys putting together our Megasquirts, olde Haltechs, & the Jaycar programable ECUs; & now Speeduino, on little rigs in our garages & cars.

So how about this guy, having a play also, doing his PhD on tuning engines in real-time, on the fly.

Just look at his setup !

I want his DC engine dyno.

https://hackaday.com/2015/01/28/raspberry-pi-learns-how-to-control-a-combustion-engine/

P.S.  I can't even work out what kind of 4 cylinder engine it is, as there is so many wires & plumbing over & around it !   Actually, he describes it as a 2 litre 4 cylinder GM EcoTec engine, when I listened again carefully.

Cheers Banjo 

Edited by Banjo

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Having lots of fun with this system, & just implementing the crankshaft trigger sensor at the moment, which I will document in this thread shortly.

Have been reading about "GMR" crankshaft position sensors, developed by Mitsubishi, which are said to be ever better than a Hall Effect sensor. 

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The sensitivity and the MR ratio of the GMR element are respectively more than 10 times higher than the sensitivity of a Hall element and the MR ratio of a ferromagnetic MR element. 

MR, the last one listed, in the table below, is I believe, what we more commonly refer to as a VR [Variable Reluctance] sensor)

image.png.430cf1e49b58dde86d11cce796917353.png

http://www.mitsubishielectric.com/en/about/rd/advance/pdf/vol121/vol121_tr3.pdf

 

Wouldn't mind getting hold of one of these GMR sensors, & seeing if it can't be used in this project for the flywheel tooth sensor.  Does anyone one happen to know, what current Mitsubishi model engines, use GMR sensors ?

Cheers Banjo

Edited by Banjo

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For the flywheel tooth sensor experiment, I found some Honda Civic Hall Effect sensors cheap on ebay.  A crankshaft & a camshaft sensor (2 sensors) for $ 20.00.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2PCS-Car-Auto-Camshaft-Crankshaft-Position-Sensor-For-Honda-Civic-2001-2005-L4/253646611587?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

Managed to find the connections for the crankshaft sensor on the internet last night. Hoping that the camshaft sensor connections are identical.

https://troubleshootmyvehicle.com/honda/1.7L/how-to-test-the-crank-sensor-1

I hooked it up last night on the bench, and waved it by hand past the flywheel teeth, with the sensor switching an LED, and surprise, surprise, it appeared to work perfectly.  I was a bit concerned the teeth on the flywheel, may be too close together, for the sensor to effectively switch off, between teeth.  The purpose made toothed wheels on cars, seem to have the teeth widely spaced.

DSC00728small.thumb.jpg.c7780c25bd510c2bb39db720374695c0.jpg

 

So will fit the flywheel back on, the test engine, make a stable bracket to position the sensor, run the engine, hook up a CRO to the Honda Crankshaft Position Sensor, & see how clean the resulting pulse train looks.

The other sensor at the top of the pic, is the crankshaft/flywheel trigger Hall Effect Sensor.  It triggers off two rare earth magnets, I embedded in the flywheel, exactly 180 deg apart.

P.S.  Does anyone know where I can get the harness connectors for these sensors, here in Oz ?  They sell them in the USA, as a repair item, complete with wires, but neither Amazon or the USA spares companies, will ship or post them to Australia.  Might have to head to the wreckers, with a pair of wire cutters in my back pocket !

https://www.amazon.com/Position-Sensor-Harness-Repair-2001-2005/dp/B078JZZJWF/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1533860684&sr=1-1&keywords=Honda+Civic+crankshaft+sensor+connector+harness

Cheers Banjo 

 

Edited by Banjo

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I had a good weekend experimenting with the Honda crankshaft sensor, on the 5K engine, with the engine rotating.  I was delighted to find it worked perfectly, & that my concerns that the teeth on the flywheel ring gear were possibly too close, to effectively prevent the Hall Effect device/sensor from turning off, were not realised.

DSC00708small.thumb.jpg.05d86b8dac2c835b335acc5fb007cc0c.jpg

This is the area, where I mounted crankshaft trigger sensor.  It is accessible from the underside of the engine.

DSC00719small.thumb.jpg.d46123223e31b95d54909deb7af4c16e.jpg'

The Hall Effect sensor fitted through the engine backing plate, with air gap circled. On the RHS of pic is the Hall Effect sensor & its cable.  On the LHS of pic is the remains of a previous experiment, where the radial inserted rare earth magnets, let go after a few months operation. I'm still find little bits of smashed rare earth magnet, attached to various items at the back of the engine !

DSC00710small.thumb.jpg.cf31da95714f5db6bc0adb55e19e7709.jpg

Before fitting the two (2) rare earth magnets to the flywheel, I used the pilot hole to drill the hole in the engine backing plate so the centre of the magnet & the centre of the Hall Effect sensor lined up perfectly.  The flywheel bolts onto the crankshaft in six (6) different positions, (60 deg apart) so you will always be able to find a point suitable for the trigger point position range required for any particular ECU requirements.

DSC00722small.thumb.jpg.3dce444302064ce022ab3148596e080d.jpg''

The trigger sensor accessablity from under the rear of the engine.

The CRO traces of the ring gear teeth sensor, & flywheel trigger sensor, indicated they were both working well.

All these tests were done with the spark plugs removed, & the starter motor used to crank the motor.

DSC00731small.thumb.jpg.d2488cd881dd27ca16e4cc2dfa30fafa.jpg

12 Volt flywheel ring gear teeth clean square wave pulses.

DSC00733small.thumb.jpg.808927c773bbc4348d5819e7dbb82ca2.jpg

Crankshaft trigger pulses.

Next test is the fit the Honda sensor permanently in a cut-out of the bell housing, a little bit higher than its temporary position, so it is easily accessible from within the engine bay, behind the oil filter area.

DSC00744small.thumb.jpg.fc3399b19f5910ac8f7b2f8af279f83b.jpg

Honda Crankshaft sensor in temporary position for tests. (It's almost like it was physically designed for this K Series engine application !

My design criteria is, that all sensors must be accessible, & easily replaced from the outside of the engine, without any major “removals”.

I’ll then refit the bellhousing & rear engine mount, & run the engine at operating revs up to say 3K-4K rpm, and check that the pulsed outputs from both sensors, still remain stable & clean.

Only the non critical synch pulse to do now, somewhere off the camshaft train, & I’m then ready to do some tests on an external ecu & ignition system connected to these sensors, but not actually running the engine.

Lots of fun, & a good learning experience.  The timing & the absolute accuracy & reliability of these sensor signals are critical to whether the ecu works well on not.  Doesn’t matter how good the ecu is, if the signals are poor, the results will be less than ideal.

What do they say . . . “rubbish in, then rubbish out”

Cheers Banjo

Edited by Banjo

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