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What do these rims fit? Help Please.


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G'day Guys, 

I have a set of JDM rims that I bought to fit a Datsun 120y. Unfortunately I did a novice manoeuvre and didn't check the offset.

The rims are  114.3     4 stud    offset +38      14in.

Tyres on these rims are195/60R14 86H

If any of you brilliant and knowledgably people can help figure out what car they can fit that would be very much appreciated.

Cheers

Derek 

Edited by Derek S
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Sadly it seems you are right..  I've spent an hour or two at the wreckers looking for FWD hubs to put on a KE70 front suspension and it seems once they got over the first couple of years of FWD manufacturing everyone went to 4x100 for small cars or 5-stud for medium cars.  I was hoping for some post-2000 Toyota FWD setup to give a KE70 an extra 200mm of track.

Those rims will fit the 1980s AE90 Corolla, but not after that.  The 1991- AE100, were already 4x100 then.

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/toyota/corolla/1988/

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On 10/15/2021 at 9:24 AM, altezzaclub said:

Those rims will fit the 1980s AE90 Corolla, but not after that.  The 1991- AE100, were already 4x100 then.

https://www.wheel-size.com/size/toyota/corolla/1988/

No FWD Corolla is 4x114.3 - E80 onwards (not including AE85/AE86) were all FWD up until the early 2000s, at which point some markets moved to 5x100 (and a couple of years later some others moved to 5x114.3)

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My theory is that they work on wheel bearing/driveshaft design first, and the size of those then drives the size of the hub and then the size of the PCD.

 

And several of them being similar comes down to metric equivalents of imperial diameters (ie 100 is 4", 108 is 4.25", 114.3 is 4.5"), and some of them are then rounded further to the nearest 5/10mm or were a metric design to begin with (like 110)

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Yer you prolly right. 4x100 vs 5 x 100 always confuses me. arguably same or very simliar bearing and hub size (As its the same pcd). more clamping force? more power?  but then i've never heard of high powered 4x100 cars having an issue with wheels falling off due to being 4 stud and not 5. Suppose there must be a reason. If more studs is better, but then how much worse is one less...

 

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There's probably some invisible unknown factor that most of us would never be able to work out unless we worked in the engineering department of a manufacturer.  Who knows, maybe on some cars 4x100 is fine but for a slightly heavier/more powerful car the safety factor dips below 10 (or some other absurdly conservative factor that they keep above for legal reasons) and have to go for an extra stud.

 

Just don't look at 60s/70s French cars with only 3-stud wheels - and I don't only mean dinky little 2CVs either, the V6 Alpine A310s were 3-stud too...

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